SoE students bring home top honours

The School of Engineering is pleased to extend congratulations to the following graduate students on these significant achievements.

Kishoare Tamanna with CSCE President, Dr. Jim Gilliland.

Kishoare Tamanna with CSCE President, Dr. Jim Gilliland.

Kishoare Tamanna, a MASc student in her first year, has been awarded 3rd place for the Best Student Paper in Engineering Mechanics and Materials at the CSCE Annual Conference.

This award was based on a two-stage evaluation: content of the paper by the technical committee, and presentation at the conference.

Her primary focus of research is the utilization of recycled rubber particles and recycled coarse aggregates as partial replacement of fine aggregates and natural coarse aggregates in concrete that can contribute substantially towards the production of green concrete and can provide a viable solution to address the harmful environmental effects of solid waste disposal.

Tamanna intends to investigate further into other strength criteria of concrete with combination of both crumb rubber and recycled aggregate to comprehend the overall performance of rubberized concrete with RCA for structural applications of concrete.

 

Moein Ahmadipour with CSCE President, Dr. Jim Gilliland.

Moein Ahmadipour with CSCE President, Dr. Jim Gilliland.

Moein Ahmadipour, PhD candidate in civil engineering, was awarded 2nd place for the Best Student Paper in Engineering Mechanics and Materials at the CSCE Annual Conference.

Ahmadipour’s study presents the finite element simulation of composite timber I-joists to predict the load-carrying capacity of these beams with respect to size and location of the web hole and flange cut.  He has shown that his proposed finite element simulation can capture the behaviour of the beams accurately.

 

Mohammad Haji Mohammadi, PhD candidate in mechanical engineering, was awarded the Best Paper Award in the session on turbulent flows at the 26th Canadian Congress of Applied Mechanics (CANCAM), held May 28 - 31, 2017.

Mohammadi's presentation was on an efficient mathematical formulation to simulate the behaviour of air bubbles in water flowing through hydroelectric turbines.  The water flowing through the turbine is typically deprived of dissolved oxygen, which can damage the ecology downstream of the turbine.  Air bubbles are added to increase the oxygen content of the water.

This simulation achieves very accurate prediction of the bubbles' movement using a framework that is very efficient to compute using high-performance supercomputers.  His work will ensure that BC's hydroelectric power production has minimal negative impacts on river ecology.

 

Leave a Reply